Home > Soul > Part I > 7. The Origin of Pain

 

The studies of near-death experiences suggest that conscious perception may not be localized in the brain (Chapter 1). Indeed, all neurosurgeons know that the brain itself does not feel pain. Several types of brain surgery can be performed with local anesthetics which inactivate the pain receptors in the scalp and meninges that cover the brain. The patient can be fully awake and feels no pain while the surgeon is cutting brain tissues.

The Geon Hypothesis posits that the mind is a geon generated by neuronal firing in the brain (Chapter 6). It is the geon that feels the pain. The nervous system is responsible for producing the geon, but not directly involved in conscious perception. Neurophysiological studies have established that the pain arises from increased neural activities in several brain areas, collectively called the "pain matrix" (Figure 7).

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Figure 7. The main areas in the "pain matrix". SI: primary somatosensory cortex; SII: secondary somatosensory cortex; ACC: anterior cingulate cortex; INS: insula cortex; dlPFC: dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. [Source: Monroe et al., 2015]

Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revealed that patients with fibromyalgia exhibited significantly elevated neural activity in the pain matrix (Cagnie et al., 2014). Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings have also shown increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, particularly at the theta band (Fallon et al., 2018). The stronger the activity of the pain matrix, the more gravitational (GR) and electromagnetic (EM) waves will be produced, thus increasing the density of these waves in the geon. These findings suggest that fundamentally the feeling of pain could arise from the "squeezing" of increased GR and EM waves within a geon.

If higher density of GR and EM waves in a geon gives rise to pain, then does pleasure result from lower wave density? (Next Chapter)

 

Author: Frank Lee
Date: 2019-11-8