Home > Conscious > Chapter 8 > 8.4. Standstill by Standing Waves

 

A standing wave is formed by the superposition of two waves with the same frequency and amplitude, but moving in opposite directions (Figures 8.6). It does not go anywhere. Hence, the key to hold gravitational (GR) waves in a confined region to create a geon is to form standing waves, as proposed in John Wheeler's original paper.

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Figure 8-6. A standing wave. The blue wave moves toward right while the red wave moves in the opposite direction. The combined wave (black) does not propagate. [Source: Wikipedia]

Standing GR Waves

In a brain, as ions pass through a channel, they will radiate GR waves in all directions. If two neurons fire synchronously, the GR waves generated by one neuron may form standing waves with those generated by another neuron. The spherical shape of the brain is well suited for the formation of numerous standing waves during synchronized neuronal firing in the cerebral cortex (Figure 8-7). Interestingly, the brains of all higher animals are close to a sphere. They may also have consciousness. Although GR waves can be generated by ionic motions in all kinds of biological systems, the system without a spherical brain (such as plants and lower animals) should not have consciousness. Theoretical studies also suggest that the sphere is a preferred geometry for the creation of gravitational geons (Anderson and Brill, 1997).

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Figure 8-7. The GR waves (arrows) generated by synchronized neuronal firing in the cerebral cortex may form numerous standing waves to create a gravitational geon. The thalamus, located at the center of the brain, is a major source of the cortical activities through thalamocortical pathways.

Since free GR waves travel at the speed of light, the GR waves generated by non-synchronous neurons may not form standing waves. This explains the importance of synchronization in creating a geon. Synchronization also facilitates constructive interference, which is crucial for the mutual attraction of GR waves (Section 8.5).